The Humility of Reading (or The Pride of Not Reading)

We've all been warned about the connection between pride and reading. Charles Spurgeon warned that "little learning and much pride come with hasty reading." Bertrand Russell once observed, "There are two motives for reading a book. One, that you enjoy it. The other; that you can boast about it." Alan Jacobs has similarly commented: “I think … Continue reading The Humility of Reading (or The Pride of Not Reading)

10 Quick Tips for Becoming an Excellent Bible Interpreter

Becoming a skilled interpreter of Scripture is not a complicated task. It is hard, but it isn't complicated. God does not hide the riches of his Word from the simple; he hides them from the proud and ungodly. Right interpretation, then, is first a matter of personal character and piety, and then a matter of methodology. … Continue reading 10 Quick Tips for Becoming an Excellent Bible Interpreter

The Pursuit of Mutual Encouragement: A Mark of Spiritual Maturity

I hadn't noticed it until recently, but Paul says something unexpected in the first chapter of Romans. The apostle first introduces himself to the church (1:1), then underscores his theological and spiritual credentials (1:2-7), and expresses his genuine love for the believers in Rome (1:8). Paul longs to see these brothers and sisters, and he … Continue reading The Pursuit of Mutual Encouragement: A Mark of Spiritual Maturity

Using Criticism for Our Benefit: A Word from Charles Spurgeon

Toward the end of the first volume of his autobiography, Charles Spurgeon relays a somewhat amusing yet instructive anecdote of a time when he would regularly receive comments on his sermons from an anonymous critic. While preaching at the Exeter Music Hall,  the "unknown censor" would send Spurgeon "a weekly list of [his] mispronunciations and other slips of speech" (533). Amazingly, Spurgeon's … Continue reading Using Criticism for Our Benefit: A Word from Charles Spurgeon